MVLA Scholar Looking for Low-Cost Room to Rent

mvlahouseOne of our MVLA Scholars needs a low-cost room to rent from now until September 2017.

 

Michael Viray is an incredible young man in need of a place to live ASAP. Below is a short self description and recommendation from his mentor, a Los Altos High School assistant principal.

 

“Hi! My name is Michael Viray and I am currently looking for low-cost housing. I am from Mountain View and am attending Foothill College this year. I am majoring in sociology and hoping to explore more in the health field. I am a very neat and tidy person. I am very courteous and love all types of pets. Currently I am applying to transfer next fall and I am very willing to respect all rules of the house. Thank you for taking the time to read this and hopefully I can hear back from you”.  

 

Letter of reference from Galen Rosenberg, Assistant Principal, Los Altos High School:

I’ve known Michael Viray for more than two years as a student, employee and recently as a housemate. I can endorse him as a responsible, hard working, neat and friendly person. He has been an entirely pleasant, quiet, responsible tenant for the last several weeks and I am sure any person renting to him will be pleased to have him around. He also got along great with our dog. Galen Rosenberg, assistant principal, Los Altos High School, 650-960-8814

 

If you have a room to rent, please contact MVLA Scholars at:  mvla_scholars@losaltoscf.org

 

MVLA Scholars is a program of the Los Altos Community Foundation

2016 Brunch Pictures

Thanks to all that made the 2016 LACF Brunch a huge success.

justin steele google.org

Special thanks to Justin Steele from Google.org for explaining his approach to local giving, and Judy Crates  and two students from E3 for talking about the program and LACF.

 

What questions do you think candidates for the Los Altos City Council in 2016 should answer?

Los Altos City Council Candidates Forum

October 6, 2016

7:00 – 9:00 pm

Eagle Theater, Los Altos High School, 201 Almond Avenue

 

What questions do you think candidates for the Los Altos City Council in 2016 should answer?

 

If you want to submit questions and/or vote on questions submitted by others:

 

1. Go to this link: http://tinyurl.com/ 2016CityCouncilCandidateQs

2. Enter your question in the field marked “Enter a response”

3. Hit the submit button so your question(s) are saved.

4. Select “Top” and/or “New” and vote up or down questions submitted by others by clicking on the tabs with arrows on them.

 

Questions are submitted anonymously and will be reviewed by the moderator before they are posted.

 

Questions submitted may be used during the October 6 Los Altos City Council Candidates Forum, 7-9PM at Los Altos High School Eagle Theater – Mark Your Calendar!

 

Co-sponsors of the October 6 Los Altos City Council Candidates Forum include the American Association of University Women Los Altos-Mountain View, the Center for Age-Friendly Excellence (CAFE), the Community Center Alliance, GreenTown Los Altos, the Los Altos Community Coalition, the Los Altos Community Foundation, Los Altos Forward, the Los Altos Women’s Caucus, and Our New Library.

The questions and opinions expressed are not necessarily those of Co-sponsors of the Forum.

 

2016 LACF Impact

LACF Impact Anniversary banner.2ai

The following is a partial list of how your support has enabled LACF to impact our community during the past year.

 

Strengthening our Nonprofit Community through Grantmaking:

  • LACF and its funds gave over $1.4M in grants and scholarships (over $10M since LACF’s founding).
  • More than 59% of these grants went to Los Altos, Los Altos Hills and Mountain View, supporting need-based scholarships and grants to nonprofits focusing on Arts & Culture, Community Building, Health & Safety, Seniors, Vulnerable populations, and Youth & Education.
  • Scholarships totaling $160,000 were awarded to 72 local high school graduates.
  • LACF’s Community Grants program awarded 54 grants this fiscal year.
  • The Community Grants program is partnered with the David and Lucile Packard Foundation (9th year) and the Heising-Simons Foundation (2nd year).
  • LACF was honored as the Outstanding Foundation Grantmaker by the Silicon Valley chapter of the Association of Fundraising Professionals.
  • Addressing Community Needs through LACF Programs and Initiatives
  • Our community is better prepared for disasters through LACF’s Los Altos Prepare.  City, County Fire, CERTs, HAMs and LACF’s Block Action Team (BAT) leaders have coordinated response plans in case of a major emergency.
  • Los Altos Dispute Resolution Service (LADRS) has solved hundreds of neighbor-to-neighbor, tenant/landlord and other types of disputes for over 20 years via this free mediation program.
  • Your donations helped local seniors.  The Center for Age-Friendly Excellence (CAFE) is leading communities throughout our county in becoming ‘Age-Friendly’ – World Health Organization recognized for communities committed to seniors’ quality of life.
  • LACF accepted two projects, GreenTown Los Altos and MVLA Service League of Boys, to its nonprofit incubation program.  LACF now supports 16 programs addressing community needs.

Investing in the Next Generations:

  • More than 30 families and individuals will be giving back to our community forever through their legacy gifts to LACF.  Legacy gifts to LACF’s Community Endowment fund benefit future generations.  Marion and Bob Grimm’s legacy gift has been contributed to the fund.
  • LACF’s E3 Youth Philanthropy program celebrated 10 years of teaching our teens to give back to their community.  Your donations enabled us to hire a new program director, Judy Crates, a respected, retired principal who brings exciting new ideas to the program.

Developing and Recognizing Community Leaders:

  • Leadership Education Advancement Program (LEAD): More than 350 LEAD graduates over 20 years, many have become City or nonprofit leaders.
  • Celebrated 25 exceptional volunteers from 25 local nonprofits at the 12th annual John W. Gardner Awards dinner.
  • LACF and its programs enabled hundreds of volunteers to contribute to the community this year.

Improving the Quality of Life in Our Community:

  • LACF hosted the 15th annual 4th of July community picnic in Shoup Park.  Families of all ages enjoyed the games, events, and patriotic music.
  • Los Altos Forward, a program of LACF, is now in its 5th year of supporting Downtown Los Altos First Fridays.  This past year the program started Club 55, a “pop-up” social club for seniors.
  • Los Altos Forward has hosted more than 30 educational, free “Community Conversations” about creating vibrant communities.

Fostering Innovative Philanthropy:

  • Partnered with the Los Altos School District to create an online “bulletin board” to connect teachers with available local housing.
  • Worked with Google, LinkedIn, Synopsys, and Symantec to create the Mountain View Corporate Philanthropy Fund to address social issues in Mountain View.
  • Offered community members a chance to learn about social benefit philanthropy from Thane Kreiner of the Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship, who spoke at the 24th annual LACF brunch.

Your support of LACF made these accomplishments possible.  Thank you!

Donate Online

Empoder helps girls code their future

Thirty-two low-income, primarily Latina, middle school girls are immersing themselves in code during Empoder’s 4-week summer program.

Empoder CEO and Founder, Marissa Ynez, said the girls learn to program through fun, hands-on projects that are socially relevant. For example, one student created a program that taught immigrant parents how to use technology more effectively.

“If girls learn to code in middle school before they see themselves as ‘unable’, they can acquire the interest, skills, and confidence to take the high school classes required to be technology majors in college,” said Los Altos Hills resident Ynez, herself a Latina engineer.

One student, Paula, said the program is a radical change from her usual classes.

“Here we learn things like how math and numbers matter and how they apply to the real world,” she said. “It makes us realize engineering is actually fun.”

The teaching team of 16 volunteer high school students trained for 2 ½ weeks to engage middle school girls in STEM.

One volunteer, Nahe Sharma, an on-line high school student who recently moved to Silicon Valley from Brasil, said it’s amazing seeing these students learn material five grades above their current level.

“The girls are getting it and enjoying it!” Sharma said.

But the learning doesn’t stop there.

After the summer session, students are encouraged to participate in Empoder’s year-round programs aimed at giving them the skills they’ll need to succeed in STEM classes in high school and beyond.

Because of your support of Los Altos Community Foundation, Paula and 31 other girls have experienced firsthand the excitement of technology.  Together with Empoder, we’re helping to bridge the digital divide.

Thanks for your support of Los Altos Community Foundation and its Community Grants program.

ALearn a “Catalyst” low income students

This summer, 54 low-income middle school students from Mountain View Whisman School District dedicated 6 1/2 hours each day to catalyzing their math and study skills and preparing for college-prep classes at Los Altos and Mountain View High Schools, thanks to your generous support.

In addition to 4 hours of math, ALearn’s Catalyst to High School’s students spent 1 ½ hours preparing for the transition to high school and beyond by:

  • Learning study skills and note-taking techniques
  • Participating in career-path self-assessments
  • Visiting local universities
  • Preparing ‘college scrap boards’ to help them make college-readiness a reality

Credentialed teachers and teaching assistants, some former ‘Catalyst’ students, run the program.

Glenda Vargas, a third-year ALearn teaching assistant and Chapman University senior, had a blast in ‘Catalyst’ before starting at Los Altos High School.

“I wanted to get a flavor of what high school would be like and to become familiar with the materials,” Vargas said.

She did not have transportation to or from school, so she and a classmate rode the 6 a.m. bus every morning and returned in the afternoon, rewarding themselves with a Jack in the Box treat each day after class.

Another ‘Catalyst’ student said the program opened new worlds to her.

‘Catalyst’ student Ana Jiminez said the program helped her discover that math is exciting and isn’t just numbers and equations.

“Even though math wasn’t my favorite subject in school coming into ‘Catalyst’,” Jiminez said, “the program made me realize that math actually was my favorite subject.”

She said the teachers created an exciting learning environment.

“They were very helpful to every student and made the program fun…,” said Jiminez.

Thanks to your support, the Los Altos Community Foundation’s Community Grants program can continue to help inspire more students like Ana, Glenda and others who need an extra boost to succeed.

Empoder helps girls code their future

Thirty-two low-income, primarily Latina, middle school girls are immersing themselves in code during Empoder’s 4-week summer program.

Empoder CEO and Founder, Marissa Ynez, said the girls learn to program through fun, hands-on projects that are highly relevant socially. For example, one student created a program that taught immigrant parents how to use technology more effectively.

“If girls learn to code in middle school before they see themselves as ‘unable’, they can acquire the interest, skills, and confidence to take the high school classes required to be technology majors in college,” said Los Altos Hills resident Ynez, herself a Latina engineer.

One student, Paula, said the program is a radical change from her usual classes.

“Here we learn things like how math and numbers matter and how they apply to the real world,” she said. “It makes us realize engineering is actually fun.”

The teaching team of 16 volunteer high school computer science students have trained for 2 ½ weeks to engage middle school girls in STEM.

One volunteer, Nahe Sharma, an on-line high school student who recently moved to Silicon Valley from Brasil, said it’s amazing seeing these students learn material five grades above their current level.

“The girls are getting it and enjoying it!” Sharma said.

But the learning doesn’t stop there.

After the summer session, students are encouraged to participate in Empoder’s year-round programs aimed at giving them the skills they’ll need to succeed in STEM classes in high school and beyond.

 

Because of your support of Los Altos Community Foundation, Paula and 31 other girls have experienced firsthand the excitement of technology.  Together with Empoder, we’re helping to bridge the digital divide in our communities.

 

Thanks for your support of Los Altos Community Foundation and its Community Grants program.

Do you have an extra room to rent?

cartoon houses

cartoon houses

 

Dear LACF Friends,

Our community values our high quality, dedicated teachers.

However given the high cost of local housing, many of our teachers are struggling to find nearby affordable accommodations and are unable to live as part of our community

Los Altos School District and Los Altos Community Foundation have partnered to create a bulletin board that will connect LSDS teachers with local residents who have available housing to rent.

If you have an available room, suite, in-law unit, apartment, etc. that you would like rent out to a teacher, please let us know.

To indicate your interest, please fill out this online form.  Or contact Erin Green, LASD director of student and staff services at egreen@lasdschools.org or(650) 947-1150.

Thanks for your help!
Joe Eyre
Executive Director

Los Altos Community Foundation